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The Pink Cloud from Outer Space (Video Coverage)

Michael Heiland serendipitously took this phenomenal time lapse video of the pink space cloud reported over Arizona last week on 2/25/2015. The cloud was formed by the Air Force Research Lab's rocket-launched ionospheric research experiment .  The video was taken from Michael's perch on Mount Lemmon northeast of Tucson.




Based on the timing of this video showing the appearance of the cloud pretty much coincident with sunrise, the two science questions remain unanswered.

Did the substance released in the experiment react chemically with the sparse oxygen in the ionosphere causing a glow in the process, as in the first Smoke Puff experiment back in 1956[2]?

Or, was sunlight responsible for ionizing the substance in the same manner as the phosphorous payload released in the Smoke Puff 2 experiment[3]?

+Michael Heiland is a bit of a phenomenon himself.  He became famous for a gorgeous time lapse video of the Phoenix valley he made as a high school senior.  More examples of his photography and videography can be found at MichelHeiland.com[4]

References;
1.  Pink Clouds and Science Reruns
http://copaseticflow.blogspot.com/2015/02/pink-clouds-and-science-reruns.html

2.  Journal of Chemical Physics coverage of the 1956 experiments, (apologies for the paywall)
http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/jcp/25/1/10.1063/1.1742832

3.  1958 Popular Mechanics article describing the first series of experiments
http://goo.gl/gZ72AR

4.  http://www.michaelheiland.com/

5.  More coverage of the 1950s experiment:
http://copaseticflow.blogspot.com/2014/07/project-smoke-puff-haarp-chemtrails.html



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