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What proposed bill AB-2756 Means for CA Homeschoolers

In a nutshell the proposed bill AB-2756 could result in every homeschooling family in the state of California could being visited on a yearly basis by their local fire chief who would in fact be required to do so.  The bill really has nothing to do with the authors' concerns for your fire safety, it was inspired by an awful incident of child abuse that occurred in Perris, CA (this was an awful read for me, I'm putting it here for informational purposes, but be warned.).  The Homeschool Association of California has written up their thoughts on the bill.  If you'd like to contact your assemblymember regarding the bill, you can find their contact information here.  If you'd like to contact the authors' of the proposed bill their contact information is listed below.


Medina, Jose

61DemocratContact Assembly Member Jose Medina

Capitol Office, Room 2141

P.O. Box 942849, Sacramento, CA 94249-0061; (916) 319-2061

District Office

1223 University Avenue, Suite 230, Riverside, CA 92507; (951) 369-6644
137 N. Perris Blvd, Suite 15, Perris, CA 92570; (951) 369-6644 
Eggman, Susan Talamantes

13DemocratContact Assembly Member Susan Talamantes Eggman

Capitol Office, Room 4117

P.O. Box 942849, Sacramento, CA 94249-0013; (916) 319-2013

District Office

31 East Channel Street, Suite 306, Stockton, CA 95202; (209) 948-7479 
Gonzalez Fletcher, Lorena S.

80DemocratContact Assembly Member Lorena S. Gonzalez Fletcher

Capitol Office, Room 2114

P.O. Box 942849, Sacramento, CA 94249-0080; (916) 319-2080

District Office

1350 Front Street, Suite 6022, San Diego, CA 92101; (619) 338-8090 
Rodriguez, Freddie

52DemocratContact Assembly Member Freddie Rodriguez

Capitol Office, Room 2188

P.O. Box 942849, Sacramento, CA 94249-0052; (916) 319-2052

District Office

13160 7th Street, Chino, CA 91710; (909) 902-9606 

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