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Baking with Beer

The gang and I made beer bread last night!  The recipe is easy.  The kids get to dump in all the ingredients, and grease the loaf pan.  I just have to run the mixer, and sample the other beers in the six pack.  If you'd like to try it, here's the recipe:

3 cups self-rising flour
3 tablespoons sugar
1 room temperature beer
Pour into a greased loaf pan, and bake for one hour at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

After an hour, you'll get a loaf of crusty bread, perfect for eating with stews, or slathering with butter, and honey on a cold day.

We used New Belgium Pmupkick beer on a lark to see if we'd get pumpkin flavored bread.  Sure enough, there's a slight tang of pumpkin flavor, and the bread came out a little bit orange!  It was also a little shorter than usual, so now we have an experiment to work on for a few weeks.  Was the bread short

  • Because we used the large loaf pan?
  • Because of the pumpkin beer?  We normally use cheap beer like Pabst Blue Ribbon or Lone Star.
  • Because we followed the instructions for once, and poured in a room temp beer instead of a cold beer?

Have any other ideas?  Let us know how your experiments work out!

NOTE:  We can't buy self-rising flour in our neighborhood so we use the following substitution via Martha Stewart:

1 cup flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/8 teaspoon salt



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