Skip to main content

Blake's and the Green Chile Cheeseburger

 On our recent trip to New Mexico, seven year old No. 1 and I got to stop at Blake’s, a favorite of almost all New Mexicans!  The place was clean, well lit, and the help was friendly.  At Blakes, they actually cook your burger after you order it.  Since I didn’t feel like waiting, I called our order in from our hotel before we headed out. 

1 tore through 7/8s of her adult-sized Lotaburger with cheese, and declared it the best burger she’d ever had.  (If you’re looking for the kid’s size, that’s called an Itsaburger.)  We ordered fries with one burger, and onion rings with the other so we could try both.  Much to her surprise, 1 discovered that she was quite enamored of onion rings, even if they are kind of hard to eat when you’ve recently sold both of your front incisors to the tooth fairy.  I had the green chile cheeseburger!  I add the exclamation point because one simply cannot get green chile on one’s cheeseburger in San Francisco.  If you’ve never had green chile, the experience is both incredible and addicting.  There’s an initial burn depending on how much rain the chile crop in NM got that year, but after awhile the burn is subsumed by a massive endorphin rush, leaving you to consume the rest of your meal in a blissful state of well-being.  Green chile isn’t for everyone, and especially, kids may not like it.  1 has yet to develop a taste for it.  I didn’t really start to love it till I was in my late teens. 

Having had such a wonderful dinner experience, we headed back in the morning for breakfast.  1 and I both had breakfast burritos.  Her’s had bacon, mine had sausage and chile.  Breakfast burritos are a wonderful New Mexico delicacy that usually consists of scrambled eggs, potatoes, cheese, and if it’s your thing some kind of breakfast meat like bacon, sausage, or chorizo.  Breakfast burritos tend to have chile sauce rather than diced chile, (although some have green chile cooked right into the eggs).  Chile sauce comes in two varieties, red and green.  If you want to come off as a native, and have the most delicious burrito ever, order the sauce as ‘Christmas’.  You’ll get both red and green.  It’s so good!  I broke my own Blake’s rule, and ordered at the drive through.  Since the breakfast burritos are also cooked when ordered, 1 and I spent about 5 minutes waiting at the drive through window, but it was worth it!  Then, loaded up with food that would last us through lunch, (breakfast burritos are huge!), we headed out to visit with friends, and make our way to Villa Nueva State Park.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Cool Math Tricks: Deriving the Divergence, (Del or Nabla) into New (Cylindrical) Coordinate Systems

The following is a pretty lengthy procedure, but converting the divergence, (nabla, del) operator between coordinate systems comes up pretty often. While there are tables for converting between common coordinate systems, there seem to be fewer explanations of the procedure for deriving the conversion, so here goes!

What do we actually want?

To convert the Cartesian nabla



to the nabla for another coordinate system, say… cylindrical coordinates.



What we’ll need:

1. The Cartesian Nabla:



2. A set of equations relating the Cartesian coordinates to cylindrical coordinates:



3. A set of equations relating the Cartesian basis vectors to the basis vectors of the new coordinate system:



How to do it:

Use the chain rule for differentiation to convert the derivatives with respect to the Cartesian variables to derivatives with respect to the cylindrical variables.

The chain rule can be used to convert a differential operator in terms of one variable into a series of differential operators in terms of othe…

The Valentine's Day Magnetic Monopole

There's an assymetry to the form of the two Maxwell's equations shown in picture 1.  While the divergence of the electric field is proportional to the electric charge density at a given point, the divergence of the magnetic field is equal to zero.  This is typically explained in the following way.  While we know that electrons, the fundamental electric charge carriers exist, evidence seems to indicate that magnetic monopoles, the particles that would carry magnetic 'charge', either don't exist, or, the energies required to create them are so high that they are exceedingly rare.  That doesn't stop us from looking for them though!

Keeping with the theme of Fairbank[1] and his academic progeny over the semester break, today's post is about the discovery of a magnetic monopole candidate event by one of the Fairbank's graduate students, Blas Cabrera[2].  Cabrera was utilizing a loop type of magnetic monopole detector.  Its operation is in concept very simpl…

Unschooling Math Jams: Squaring Numbers in their own Base

Some of the most fun I have working on math with seven year-old No. 1 is discovering new things about math myself.  Last week, we discovered that square of any number in its own base is 100!  Pretty cool!  As usual we figured it out by talking rather than by writing things down, and as usual it was sheer happenstance that we figured it out at all.  Here’s how it went.

I've really been looking forward to working through multiplication ala binary numbers with seven year-old No. 1.  She kind of beat me to the punch though: in the last few weeks she's been learning her multiplication tables in base 10 on her own.  This became apparent when five year-old No. 2 decided he wanted to do some 'schoolwork' a few days back.

"I can sing that song... about the letters? all by myself now!"  2 meant the alphabet song.  His attitude towards academics is the ultimate in not retaining unnecessary facts, not even the name of the song :)

After 2 had worked his way through the so…